Energy efficiency
Blog | October 1, 2018 by Claire Cowan
As Energy Efficiency Day approaches on Friday, Oct. 5, we reflect on the ways Wisconsin, the home of our headquarters, can learn from our more progressive neighbors who are making energy efficiency a priority. Our expert, Claire Cowan, director of program design and delivery, now resides in the northeastern state of Maine. Claire gives you a look into the energy efficiency potential available to another state with a similar climate to Wisconsin. More
Increasing risk
Blog | August 23, 2018 by Steve Kihm
On the path to a cleaner, more sustainable energy future, we will have to make decisions that have uncertain outcomes. In other words, they involve risk. Newer technologies might not work well—or they might work better than expected. Customers might not embrace home automation—or they might use it in ways we haven’t even imagined. More
Investor value creation
Blog | August 9, 2018 by Steve Kihm
If regulators want to steer utility investment toward renewable, sustainable resources, and away from carbon-emitting types, they can apply basic investor value creation concepts when implementing policy. The key consideration is the size of the gap between two rates of return: (1) the profit rate utilities earn, and (2) the minimum threshold return that investors require. More
Blog | January 19, 2018 by Elizabeth Schroeder
WECC is proud to champion and deliver innovative energy initiatives. Along this journey, we are often inspired by other industry leaders who develop technologies, policies, and business models that foster a prosperous and sustainable energy future. As we look ahead to 2018 and beyond, several emerging industry trends are likely to shape the nature of our work here at WECC. Read on to discover how the way we use and create energy will continue to change this year. More
Publication
Publication | December 1, 2016 by
ACEEE 2016 paper by Steve Kihm, et al. More
Brexit, utilities and investor risk
Blog | June 24, 2016 by Steve Kihm
Risk assessment can be a slippery concept. The U.S. financial market reaction to the decision of U.K. voters to leave the European Union shines a bright light on this issue. In reaction to the “Leave” victory, investors pulled money out of every U.S. sector but one—utilities, which received net inflows, as did Treasury bonds. See chart. More